Legal Advice

After a death, there are many legal matters to resolve. Though it is not necessary to hire a lawyer, it is strongly recommended. The time following a death of a loved one is extremely emotional, and even the closest family will have disagreements over seemingly trivial matters.  To ensure peace in the family, it is a good idea to let a lawyer tend to all legal matters.

Before getting in touch with a lawyer there are several important documents that you need to gather.  Those include:

  • Wills
  • Deeds
  • Bank Statements
  • Insurance Policies
  • Vehicle and Boat titles
  • Tax Documents

Bank Accounts

What is to be done with bank accounts after a death varies regionally.  In some regions, bank accounts are automatically frozen after a death. To avoid any complications, the bank should be notified immediately, and you should find out the procedures for releasing these funds, and how to set up a new account for funds received after the death. See More.

Death Certificates

Death Certificates are required in order to preform cremation of burial. There are 3 main steps that a death certificate must go through before it can be completed and the cremation can be preformed. First the funeral home fills out demographic information collected from the family, then the doctor or medical examiner must list cause of death and sign off on it, then the County where the death occurred must sign off. See More

Wills

Everyone knows they should have a will, but the vast majority of us do not.  Writing a will is easy and inexpensive, and once you are done you can rest easy knowing your hard earned money and property will be distributed according to your wishes. See More

Probate

Probate is the legal process that transfers the legal title of property from the estate of the deceased to their beneficiaries.  See More

Executors

An executor is the personal representative of your estate.  They are the person in charge of taking control of your assets, paying off any debts, and distributing assets to your beneficiaries per the terms and conditions of your will. See More